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The use of artificial intelligence (AI) to aid medical diagnosis or rationalise healthcare raises similar ethical challenges as applications of AI in other industries, bias and discrimination among them. A prescription of selective forgetfulness for the AI may be a remedy, argue Roderick van den Bergh and Desmond Cheung.

AI has transformed industries such as online advertising and computer games. It also has great promise for transforming healthcare by optimising the delivery of services (as well as unlocking new ones), reducing healthcare professional workloads, and eventually becoming integrated across healthcare value chains [1, 2]. But stakes here are higher than…


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Telehealth is hot, and rightly so. The need for remote healthcare has only been made more urgent by Covid-19 . Arguably though, the pandemic is simply accelerating an existing and justifiable sea change whereby healthcare is moving into the home. During the pandemic our homes are everything to us. Our place of work, our creative space, our relaxation space, our sanctuary or prison.


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Patient centricity is regularly cited as a critical factor in the success or failure of many new, digitally enabled healthcare solutions. Indeed, a focus on patient needs offers the context critical to designing successful solutions. A solution may be technically advanced and clinically effective, but if we don’t like the look of it, find it hard to use or if it adds burdens to our already cluttered lives, we will simply stop using it… even if that wonderful technology seeks to improve our health or save our life! So, designing solutions that are focussed on meeting patient needs makes a…


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After a meteoric rise, and then some time in the doldrums, the “quantified self” seems to be back in favour, a trend crowned by Google acquiring Fitbit for $2 billion and accelerated by the pandemic and a greater societal focus on managing our health. Nothing new there — a classic example of Gartner’s hype cycle. But what became more apparent from CES 2021 was the potential value of our increasing ability to combine data from the quantified self (i.e. our own user-generated medical data) with environmental data to answer new questions and improve our overall approach to health.


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AI is potentially one of the most powerful agents for positive change we have. Fairly or not, technology is often seen as a dehumanising force in healthcare, but AI has the potential to automate many administrative tasks, freeing up care givers and enabling them to focus on providing human-to-human care. But is AI invoked too often to solve problems that could be solved by less complicated means?


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It’s no surprise that Health was a central topic of this year’s CES, and not just for organisations traditionally concerned with it. The following is a synthesis of four common themes at this year’s CES that may make the difference between failure and success for disruptive digital health solutions in 2021.

Trust vs. AI — trust is critical to the success of AI

Patient centricity is everything —(or is it?)

Healthcare’s coming home — with convenience comes greater complexity

Interoperability and the Quantified Environment — a new paradigm of opportunity

Trust vs. AI — trust is critical to the success…


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Some very common medical conditions like migraine have evaded diagnosis and treatment until now. We explore why Machine Learning might finally be the tool to tame migraines but why it is still not an easy path to a successful product.

Migraines affect 1 in 5 women, but we know little about what causes them, or how to prevent them. Across the EU, the cost of migraines (including direct and indirect costs) has been estimated at €27bn, but nothing can account for the negative impact on quality of life of sufferers and their families.

The complexity of migraines has meant that…


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Antimicrobial susceptibility testing at the point of care could slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance, but only creative technology development and regulatory equivalence data will unlock this prize.

The discovery of antibiotics in the 1940s changed medicine for good. Antibiotics are essential in treating serious bacterial infections, such as sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia, while infections typically treated in outpatient settings, such as ear or urinary tract infections (UTIs) can usually be cleared up in days. Antibiotics also play a vital role in preventing infection during surgery and opportunistic life-threatening infections in patients receiving chemotherapy.

However, with increasing antibiotic use worldwide…


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Recent industry deals show what automotive lidar companies need to win an OEM order: a credible path to low-cost, compact products. The sensor optics and unconventional optical designs can offer that much-needed edge over competitors, says Alex Coney.

Several lidar companies have recently taken big steps towards having their technology incorporated in series production cars. Volvo is now collaborating with Luminar to combine the company’s lidar with vehicle control systems and create a highway pilot feature, to be available in 2022, and BMW has chosen Innoviz’ lidar for its iNext product range for launch next year.

These orders from BMW…


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Monoclonal antibodies offer promise in the fight against a wide range of diseases, including COVID-19. The length of the discovery process is a barrier to emergency use, however, and poses a commercial risk for pharmaceutical companies. Multidisciplinary innovation could step up the pace, says Verity Jackson.

The current coronavirus pandemic provides an urgent example of the need for faster development of active pharmaceutical products. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in particular have demonstrated considerable value in the last decade: currently six out of the ten best-selling drugs in the world are mAbs — with a combined revenue of over $50 billion p.a…

TTP — The Technology Partnership

TTP is an independent technology company where scientists and engineers collaborate to invent, design and develop new products and technologies.

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